Nutrition status of children in Nepal: Analysis from the findings of Nepal Demographic Health Survey 2016

  • Ridesh Pokharel Manmohan Memorial Institute of Health Sciences, Kathmandu, Nepal
  • Bibhor Pokharel National Open College, Lalitpur, Nepal
  • Rajan Bhusal Manmohan Memorial Institute of Health Sciences, Kathmandu, Nepal
  • Deepika Chapagain Manmohan Memorial Institute of Health Sciences, Kathmandu, Nepal
Keywords: Children, Nutrition, Stunted, Wasted

Abstract

Introduction
Nutrition is simply the process of intake of food which is required according to the body need. A well balanced food with regular physical activity is a foundation for a good health. Some effects in health such as reduced immunity, increased susceptibility to disease, poor physical and mental development and reduction in productive capacity can be seen as a result of poor nutrition. The indicators of nutrition are stunting, wasting, underweight and overweight among the children.

Methods
The 2016 Nepal Demographic Health Survey (NDHS) measured the height and weight of eligible children under age 5 in sample households. Weight measurements were taken from lightweight SECA infant scales with a digital display (model no. SECA 878U), designed and supplied by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF). Height was measured with a measuring board (Shorr Boards®). Recumbent length was measured for children younger than age 24 months, and standing height was measured for older children.

Results
Overall, 36% of children under age 5 were stunted, with 12% being severely stunted (too short for their age); 10% were wasted, with 2% severely wasted (too thin for their height); and 27% were underweight, with 5% severely underweight (too thin for their age), while around 1% of the children were overweight (heavy for their height).

Conclusion
The different indicators of nutritional status among children such as stunting, wasting and underweight are decreasing. The national program and effective contribution from several non-governmental agencies is the main reason for the improvement in nutritious status.

Published
2019-12-30
How to Cite
Pokharel, R., Pokharel, B., Bhusal, R., & Chapagain, D. (2019). Nutrition status of children in Nepal: Analysis from the findings of Nepal Demographic Health Survey 2016. Grande Medical Journal, 1(2), 122-126. Retrieved from http://journal.grandehospital.com/index.php/GMJ/article/view/33